Seems you have not registered as a member of bridgewatercollege.org!

You may have to register before you can download all our books and magazines, click the sign up button below to create a free account.

Sign up

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 312

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey

In the second volume, the commentaries by Heubeck (Books IX-XII) and Hoekstra (Books XIII-XVI) are both preceded by introductions, with Hoekstra paying special attention to diction in the Odyssey and the tradition of epic diction in general. The introductions and commentary have been thoroughly revised and adapted to the text of T. W. Allen in the Oxford Classical Text series.

Introduction (to Lexical Grammar)
  • Language: nl
  • Pages: 48
Homeric Modifications of formulaic prototypes. Studies in the development of Greek epic diction
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 172
A Note on the Dative of Purpose (dativus Finalis) in Greek
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 8

A Note on the Dative of Purpose (dativus Finalis) in Greek

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 1962
  • -
  • Publisher: Unknown

None

Homeric Contexts
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 708

Homeric Contexts

This volume addresses questions concerning Neoanalysis and Oral theory, the two most fruitful schools of thought in Homeric criticism. It explores the development of Greek myth with respect to the Trojan war; the signs of heroic cult in Homeric poetry; the function of memory; the relation between the catalogue of ships and the Iliadic narrative; the tragedy of Achilles; the travels of Odysseus; the Telemachy and the Nostoi, the false tales and Crete; the imagery of Odyssean similes; language and formulas; the Epic Cycle; Hesiod and Homer; the epic of Alpamysh; the Iliad and the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Speaking Volumes
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 235

Speaking Volumes

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2001-01-01
  • -
  • Publisher: BRILL

This collection of essays provides a valuable cross-section of recent research into the interrelationship of orality and literacy in the ancient Greek and Roman world.

Homeric Epic and Its Reception
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 216

Homeric Epic and Its Reception

Homeric Epic and its Reception, comprising twelve chapters--some previously published but revised for this collection, and others appearing here in print for the first time--offers literary interpretations of the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite. While some chapters closely study the diction, meter, style, and thematic resonance of particular passages and episodes in the Iliad and the Odyssey, others follow diverse pathways into the interpretation of the epics, including mythological allusion, intertextuality, the metrics of the Homeric hexameter, and the fundamental contrast between divinity and humanity. Also included are two chapters which focus on the work of Milman ...

Rescue for the Dead
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 224

Rescue for the Dead

Christianity is a religion of salvation in which believers have always anticipated post-mortem bliss for the faithful and non-salvation for others. Here, Trumbower examines how and why death came to be perceived as such a firm boundary of salvation. Analyzing exceptions to this principle from ancient Christianity, he finds that the principle itself was slow to develop and not universally accepted in the Christian movement's first four hundred years. In fact, only in the West was this principle definitively articulated, due in large part to the work and influence of Augustine.

The Odyssey of Homer
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 560

The Odyssey of Homer

Homer's epic chronicle of the Greek hero Odysseus' journey home from the Trojan War has inspired writers from Virgil to James Joyce. Odysseus survives storm and shipwreck, the cave of the Cyclops and the isle of Circe, the lure of the Sirens' song and a trip to the Underworld, only to find his most difficult challenge at home, where treacherous suitors seek to steal his kingdom and his loyal wife, Penelope. Favorite of the gods, Odysseus embodies the energy, intellect, and resourcefulness that were of highest value to the ancients and that remain ideals in out time. In this new verse translation, Allen Mandelbaum--celebrated poet and translator of Virgil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy --realizes the power and beauty of the original Greek verse and demonstrates why the epic tale of The Odyssey has captured the human imagination for nearly three thousand years. From the Paperback edition.